Split Chives to Deter Pests

Bugs
Overgrown chives

We have chives growing in the garden, not only because they are tasty, but also because they are wonderful pest deterrents and great plant food.  After a couple years of growing, the chives start multiplying into a huge clump and need to be spread out so they can continue to grow in a healthy environment.  To keep your chives healthy, split them up.  Once you dig them up and split the clump into a few clumps, you now have many chives to spread around your garden for more food, pest protection, and plant food.  Or you could share some with friends.

The whole process was very easy.  Step one: Dig up the huge clump.

Step two: Separate the clump into clumps.  I shook the dirt out of the clump and jiggled the clump apart.  The roots spread fairly easy.  The kids helped with this step without harm to the plants.

We ended up with seven plants from one.

Step three: Replant the new, smaller clumps into their new homes, wherever that may be.  We put our in the giant hugel bed where the squash and giant pumpkins reside.

Done.  Once they get growing, give them a haircut every now and then for plant food.  Simply chop and then drop the clippings around whichever plant you wish to feed.  In a couple years, we will need to split the chives again.

Check out these links for more information about chives and natural pest deterrents.

The 104 Homestead

Permaculture News

Tenth Acre Farm

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Share This:

No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cooking
Canning Whole Tomatoes on the Rocket Stove

We have plenty of tomatoes. I don’t really have time to process and preserve them all, so I will squeeze in a quick round of un peeled canned tomatoes. And I’m using my rocket stove to do it. Get your jars ready, I’m using quart jars, by boiling them in …

Food Preservation
Harvesting and Infusing St. John’s Wort

Thursday Food (and Herb) Day! Continuing with the wildcrafting herbal remedy theme, today we will collect and infuse some St. John’s Wort.  This pretty herb grows wild all over the place on my homestead and all over the side of the road.  Plenty available for sutainable wild harvesting. St. John’s …

Food Forest
Yard Waste Upcycle

This is the fantastic pile of rich yard waste we have to work with: The purpose of this post is to demonstrate how a pile of twisted up “waste” can be useful for so many different things.  The pile is tree tops left by the logger and pushed aside, twisting …