Open Discussion Projects

I am going to try something different.  I am hoping to get some conversations started where people can share their ideas, information, and projects.  I plan to pick one project every month or so that I want your input on.

On the first of the month, I will post a project like a compost bin or a greenhouse.  Then, in the comment section, share your ideas. At the end of the month, I will decide on a plan for the project using everything people share.  (This is a young blog so this will work better as more people subscribe).

I am looking for links with pictures, information, and instructions.  If these links are from your own blog, even better.  If you don’t have a blog but can provide your own ideas or pictures, that is also perfect.

The idea is to keep these discussions open, even after the project is done, for others to be able to go through the links and ideas for their own projects.   Once you finish a related project, you can share that in the comments too.

Anyone who is subscribed will get post notifications in their inbox whenever we start a new conversation, generally the first of each month.  Please post in the comments section of the post, rather than in response to the email, so everyone can see the information.   It’s all about the sharing information that is gathered in one place.

As a trial run, I would love for people to share ideas that would make good potential project ideas for a homestead.  This includes gardening, permaculture, outdoor building projects etc.  So let’s here some project ideas. 1,2,3…GO!

Speaking of open discussion, check out this forum:

 

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6 thoughts on “Open Discussion Projects

  1. Composting, humanure, container gardening, alternative materials house building, off grid living, bartering, repurposing building materials, healthy eating from local sources, meaning of community (helping out each other using our own individual talents)…..

  2. Composting posts are coming up soon! Lots of good ideas, my favorite being meaning of community. We haven’t had any chances to work much with our community. That is something we plan on doing this summer. We need to get out into the community more and meet some like minded people, very important. We have been so busy getting established, I barely know anyone, even after being here for three years. I never really thought about a post on this…Definite blog post.

  3. I think a chicken coop is a great way to increase self sufficiency. This might be a good project to do.

  4. Hi Sarah,
    I just found your blog after researching earthbag homes in Maine through the Permies.com website. I am currently looking for land in Maine, was there just last weekend in the Lincoln/Lee area. We are also looking to homestead, build an earthbag home and utilize permaculture. I would love for any advice you can share, especially in regards to finding property in a nice community and building regulation snares (if any) for a super adobe home. Please feel free to email me any information/advice you may have about the initial start up as we are trying to connect with people in the area. Our next trip will be in mid-June and we will be looking in and around the area of Unity. Again any advice you would be willing to share would be greatly appreciated. We are moving from New Jersey so are completely in the dark about communities and what not. My email is Wayneblum@outlook.com Thank you and keep up the blog it’s great!

    1. I think I just replied to you on permies, haha. The town laws in Maine are based on population. We are in a small town with less than 2500 people. We had to get permits for waste water but not for building. We got our permit for our tiny house and it never was even inspected after we got the permit. We have a regulation in our area that states no tar roofing and no mobile homes. Many towns simply can’t afford to regulate the permits. As long as you ate respectful of ypur neighbors and don’t irritate them, no one reports anything. It’s a very different world here. That is why we chose this area. That and they don’t have tornados and landslides. You can hunker down and ride out a blizzard. Store lots of food and then shovel out after. Nothing too extreme.
      As far as starting out, gathet as much information about what you want to do before you move. When you change your life so drastically, you may not have time to think in the midst of things. If you have a vague idea ahead of time, it helps direct your focus a little. We also brought way too much junk. There are so many things you don’t need, don’t lug it all around. Plus there are tons of thrift shops and other places where you can buy newish things pretty cheap.
      Also be sure to find your local farms, CSAs, farmers markets and lical shops for some of the best food you have ever tasted. You have to get alot of information by driving around and talking to locals. We didn’t know that we had an amazing and cheap dairy farm one road down because the opened at 6 pm. The locals let us know the strange time and now we just plan trips around it. Everything is very different to me here. I love it though!

  5. Hi Sara, I love forums such as these. It makes me feel like i’m not the only one that has the same dream. You and I will be neighbors soon. I have been working on my camp section-ally here in ct and have been loading it in a 26ft semi trailer the past 15 months. I had lived in upper ME for about 7 years in the 90’s. How i ended up back in CT?????lol

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