Perennial Vegetables

If you are going to start a permaculture garden you need to have something more permanent than annual vegetables. Permaculture is not planting vegetables every single year. It is setting up a bed one year and harvesting every year. This means that you need perennial vegetables. Vegetables that come back for multiple years with little to no care, but still provide delicious produce to feed your family.

Permaculture also means multiple functions for everything. So what is another function DSC_0269for vegetables? Some of them are pretty, but that is not really a second function. However, perennial vegetables can also be soil builders and erosion control. As part of the plants die off every year, they add organic matter to the soil that will breakdown and feed themselves the following year. They have an established root structure rather than a flimsy root structure that will rot away. This prevents erosion by holding your soil where it is so that you don’t have to replenish next year.

I currently only have a standard garden that I have attempted to set up as a lasagna garden this year. My intention is to buy a few different perennial vegetables to plant one row of my garden as an experimental perennial vegetable bed. I will buy the obvious asparagus and some “walking” onions that I have found and whatever else I can find that could potentially be good food. The long term plan for this is to decide on which perennial vegetables are the best and start a full scale perennial garden.

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